SNMP

Most network admins and engineers are familiar with SNMPv2c which has become the dominant SNMP version of the past decade. It’s simple to configure on both

the router/switch-side and just as easy on the network monitoring server. The problem of course is that the SNMP statistical

payload is not encrypted and authentication is passed in cleartext. Most companies have decided that the information being transmitted isn’t valuable enough to be

worth the extra effort in upgrading to SNMPv3, but I would suggest otherwise.

Like IPv4 to IPv6, there are some major changes under the hood. SNMP version 2 uses community strings (think cleartext passwords, no encryption) to

authenticate polling and trap delivery. SNMP version 3 moves away from the community string approach in favor of user-based authentication and view-based

access control. The users are not actual local user accounts, rather they are simply a means to determine who can authenticate to the device. The view is used to

define what the user account may access on the IOS device. Finally, each user is added to a group, which determines the access policy for its users. Users,

groups, views.

Reference: http://www.ccnpguide.com/snmp-version-3/

——————-

The following security models exist: SNMPv1, SNMPv2, SNMPv3. The following security levels exits: “noAuthNoPriv” (no authentiation and no encryption noauth

keyword in CLI), “AuthNoPriv” (messages are authenticated but not encrypted auth keyword in CLI), “AuthPriv” (messages are authenticated and encrypted priv

keyword in CLI). SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 models only support the “noAuthNoPriv” model since they use plain community string to match the incoming packets. The

SNMPv3 implementations could be configured to use either of the models on per-group basis (in case if “noAuthNoPriv” is configured, username serves as a

replacement for community string).

Reference: http://blog.ine.com/2008/07/19/snmpv3-tutorial/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s